Communicating Effectively with Hard of Hearing People

Presented by

Dr. Jay R. Lucker, Ed.D., CCC-A/SLP
Assistant Professor and
Supervisor of Audiology
St. John's University
Jamaica, NY
(718) 990-6480
email:luckerj@sjumusic.stjohns.edu

as presented to the Huntington Chapter of SHHH (Self Help for Hard of Hearing People Inc. January 5, 1996

Introduction
How We Communicate:
How hearing loss affects communication
Compensating for this loss
What speakers need to do
What the hard of hearing person needs to do
Suggested Reading:

Introduction

The purpose of today's talk is to discuss how we communicate with one another how hearing loss affects our abilities to communicate effectively, what can be done to compensate for the loss of communication abilities when hearing loss strikes, what we want those who communicate with us to do to help make communication more effective, and what we need to do to help those who communicate with us.

How We Communicate:

We get caught up in being able to understand the words; but effective communication means understanding the ideas. We need to remember that communicating ideas comes from an overall understanding.

We understand:

How hearing loss affects communication

Hearing Loss affects how the ear picks up sound. However, in the aging population, hearing loss does affect changes in how the information we hear is "processed" by the brain and there are changes in the brain's abilities to process even the best received messages.

Hearing loss affects the sounds which can affect the words. But, hearing loss can not affect the language, situational clues, non-verbal clues, prediction clues, and expectation clues. However, we often forget these and focus on the distorted sound.

Compensating for this loss

We think that the solution to the problem of communication is to get better sound. But, this could be limited. We can compensate for poor hearing in a number of ways. Only one small way is to use a hearing aid.

Other non-auditory cues:

What speakers need to do

In order to get these extra cues, we need extra time and some extra help from our speakers. It would be great if speakers would do the following:

What the hard of hearing person needs to do

We need to help the speaker understand our needs and limitations

Suggested Reading:

Coping with Hearing Loss and Hearing Aids
by Debra A. Shimon, MS, CCC-A
Published by Singular Publishing Group, Inc. - San Diego, CA 92105